Category Archives: European Breeding Bird Atlas

EBBA2 workshop at the 21st EBCC conference, Bird Numbers 2019

More than 200 ornithologists, experts on bird monitoring, met at the beginning of April 2019 in Évora, Portugal. The conference programme covered many topics including talks and posters on bird distribution atlases. Furthermore, we organized a dedicated workshop on EBBA2 during the conference. Now a short report has been published particularly for those who are interested in EBBA2, but couldn’t attend the workshop in Évora. Since we are in final phases of producing the maps and writing the texts for the EBBA2, we encourage national coordinators, species experts and everybody interested in information where we are with the project, to read the report on EBBA2 website.

EBBA2: a new European Breeding Bird Atlas
– an exciting new challenge for European ornithology providing vital data for conservation

2nd European Breeding
Bird Atlas is now on

EBBA is on Twitter EBBA is on Facebook


Visit a new EBBA2 website at
www.ebba2.info

 

The European Bird Census Council, together with its partners across Europe, plans to produce a new atlas for breeding birds in Europe, to update the ground-breaking first atlas (Hagemeijer & Blair 1997), whose data are now 30 years old.

Why a new Atlas?

  • Over the last 30 years, many environmental changes, such as those in land use and climate, have impacted on populations of birds across Europe. For effective conservation and informed decision making, we need the most up-to-date information on these impacts.
  • Knowing where birds occur, and how this has changed, is a crucial part in targeting conservation action, and will tell us much about the state of the wider environment. It also provides valuable data for scientific analyses, and for assessing if and how projected changes are materialising.
  • New opportunities have arisen, improving our ability to incorporate even the most remote parts of Europe and provide a robust baseline for future monitoring across the whole continent.

What will the new Atlas achieve?

  • The Atlas will provide up-to-date distribution maps for birds across the whole of Europe.
  • The Atlas will show changes in species distribution since the 1980s.
  • The volume of bird data collected for the Atlas will make it one of the most comprehensive biodiversity data sets in the world.
  • New analytical approaches will allow better maps of range and relative abundance than ever before.
  • The Atlas will build capacity for conservation and monitoring in areas where this is most needed.

How will the Atlas be produced?

  • Data collection will build on existing national atlases and the vast network of volunteer citizen scientists and professional ornithologists across Europe, from the Azores to European Russia.
  • National Atlas coordinators will be responsible for compiling the data in each country.
  • The EBCC will coordinate the project across the continent as a whole.
  • The project will utilise existing data where possible, but new data will have to be collected from many areas, in particular in eastern and south-eastern Europe.
  • Analysis and production of maps will be carried out in collaboration with specialists of EBCC member organisations, including leading experts in spatial modelling and mapping.

What outputs are planned?

  • The results will be presented in a book, to be published by 2020 at the latest.
  • Interactive maps and further information will be made available online.
  • Leading scientists and conservationists will produce summaries to highlight the most crucial findings.
  • The Atlas database will be available for further scientific work.

How will the project be financed?

  • This ambitious project will require resources at both the national and European levels, and the EBCC will work with partners to explore a myriad of different funding possibilities.
  • By using volunteer citizen scientists, and existing networks of ornithologists, EBBA2 will be as efficient and low-cost as is possible to achieve such a far-reaching and ambitious goal.

For further information, please contact:
Dr Verena Keller, Chair of the EBBA2 Steering Group, verena.kellervogelwarte.ch

One of the most ambitious biodiversity mapping projects ever attempted, EBBA2 will cover:

5 years of fieldwork (2013-17)
50+ countries
500+ breeding species
5000+ 50×50 km squares

Documents for a new European Breeding Bird Atlas

2nd European Breeding
Bird Atlas is now on

EBBA is on Twitter EBBA is on Facebook

Visit a new EBBA2 website at
www.ebba2.info

Birdwatching tour in Armenia could contribute to the New European Breeding Bird Atlas

2nd European Breeding
Bird Atlas is now on

EBBA is on Twitter EBBA is on Facebook

Visit a new EBBA2 website at
www.ebba2.info

Getting data for the New European Breeding Bird Atlas (EBBA2) in eastern parts of Europe poses a challenge. Particularly the low number of local birdwatchers makes it more difficult than in countries with hundreds or thousands skilled and enthusiastic birdwatchers. Therefore, the Atlas Steering Committee in cooperation with national atlas coordinators explores other possibilities. They include use of information collected by foreign birdwatchers taking part in specific birding tours.

Here we present an offer to participate in one of such tours in Armenia already in June this year (if a minimum of two persons participate). The tour is organized by American University of Armenia – Acopian Center for the Environment, see the file attached for details . As we are in a phase of testing this approach, we will appreciate any feedback from those who take part in the tour. We will be interested in any experience, positive or negative, and any comments. However, data should be provided directly to the national atlas coordinator. For details of the tour please contact Dr. Karen Aghababyan (Contacts: 40 Baghramian Ave. 0019 Yerevan, Armenia; e-mail: karenaua.am).
Feedback from the tour should be sent to the European coordination of EBBA2: Petr Vorisek, euromonitoringbirdlife.cz.

Petr Voříšek

Documents from the workshop on the New European Breeding Bird Atlas and Atlas grids are available

2nd European Breeding
Bird Atlas is now on

EBBA is on Twitter EBBA is on Facebook

Visit a new EBBA2 website at
www.ebba2.info

The workshop was held in the Museu Blau, Natural History Museum of Barcelona, from 20 to 22 March 2013. The main goal of the workshop was to make progress in atlas work at national and European level particularly in countries that had asked for support in initial stages of the planning for the New European Breeding Bird Atlas.
More detailed report on the workshop will be published too, here we have made all the presentations available.
It was agreed at the workshop that the New European Breeding Bird Atlas will use the same grid as it was used in the first European Atlas. As the grid is very important for national atlas coordinators, it can be dowloaded here too:
Grid for Europe as well as for each individual country and atlas and abundance codes are available.

Petr Voříšek

EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds

2nd European Breeding
Bird Atlas is now on

EBBA is on Twitter EBBA is on Facebook

Visit a new EBBA2 website at
www.ebba2.info

The first comprehensive EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds, or European Ornithological Atlas (EOA) edited by Ward Hagemeijer and Mike Blair, was published in 1997. The atlas is the first major initiative of the EBCC (itself created through the merging of the European Ornithological Atlas Committee and the IBCC), and integrates 25 years of effort by thousands of volunteer field ornithologists, data analysts and writers in more than 40 countries. The final product is an impressive and voluminous book with more than 900 pages of maps of distribution for 495 European bird species, accompanying text and information on the population size estimates for key countries where it is present. The area covered includes all of Europe, including Madeira, the Azores, Iceland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and Transcaucasia) although not Turkey or Cyprus. The atlas demonstrates what can be achieved through broadscale international cooperation and has been and remains an essential tool for scientists and conservationists interested in studying the patterns of distribution and abundance of Europe’s birds.

EBCC Atlas on the Web:
easily accessible to a wide audience all distribution maps can now also be viewed through the internet. In this recent initiative, the original 50km x 50km basic spatial units in the atlas were converted to Geographic Information System (GIS) spatial references (e.g. latitude, longitude), in order to be able to display the species distribution maps on a website with different backgrounds as explained below. Because meridians of longitude converge towards the poles the original 50km by 50km grid required modifications to allow ‘squares’ to drop out as their width declined to less than 40km towards the north. Dealing with these issues in the conversion to GIS was no trivial task and the EBCC is very grateful to SOVON and especially Henk Sierdsema for all his time on this. As in the book, the dots on the map refer to six different categories of information; red = semi-quantitatively confirmed or probable breeding, orange = semi-quantitatively possible breeding, dark purple = qualitatively confirmed or probably breeding, light purple = qualitatively possible breeding, grey = no survey work, no dot = square surveyed but species not recorded. Semi-quantitative (red and orange dots) means that population sizes, in numbers of breeding pairs, for the square have been estimated to the nearest order of magnitude, as indicated by the size of the dots on the map. Not all countries were able to provide this and hence the information is qualitative (all purple and grey dots are the same size). The interactive distribution atlas is currently hosted by SOVON Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology and can be accessed through the link

Clicking on the link will display a new screen with selection options on the right hand side.

In order to display a distribution map select the species you are interested in, on one of the drop-down boxes and click on the ‘show’ button.

The distribution can be displayed on satellite images of the earth (by clicking ‘Satellite’), or on maps provided by Google Earth (by clicking ‘Map’).

The display of country borders and display of the coverage of fieldwork (see legend for explanation of the four different levels of coverage) can be turned on or off.

The size of the map can be enlarged by clicking on ‘hide’. This will hide the legend, allowing more room for displaying the map. It is also possible to use the pointer on the left of the map to zoom in or out, and to move left, right, up or down, over the area of interest.

Go to the interactive EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds

The recommended citation for the atlas remains: Hagemeijer, E.J.M. and M.J. Blair (editors). 1997. The EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds: their distribution and abundance. T & A.D. Poyser, London.

Obtaining the atlas data:

Associated with the atlas is the underlying database from which the distribution maps are derived. Over the past 10 years, the atlas data has been used by a wide variety of researchers and conservationists for purposes ranging from estimating hotspots of species occurrence to predicting the effects of climate change. Use of the data is administered via the EBCC Executive Committee and the data extraction and handling is currently done by staff at SOVON in the Netherlands or the BTO in the UK, according to agreed rules. There are countless possibilities for using this valuable dataset, and those interested should contact the EBCC Chair EBCC-chairman about the conditions for obtaining the data. Requests will be reviewed by the Executive Committee and there are usually costs for its provision and to cover data handling. EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds data are now available in UTM or GIS-format.

2004-07-15